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and welcome. five months after the uprising after colonel gaddafi's roll, britain has recognized the rebel council as the new government of libya. the u.s., france, and more than 30 other countries have recognized the council. our world affairs editor has this assessment. >> the libyan embassy in central london. a hugely valuable piece of real estate. the siege as usual by a small, ever present group of demonstrators. they were overjoyed by britain's decision to recognize them. this is tripoli where the heart of the city was the green square is decorated with a gigantic portrait of colonel gaddafi himself. he has never been a man to shrink from self publicity. britain, which was keenest about bombing libya has decided to cut the last remaining diplomatic links. >> we no longer recognize them as the representatives of the libyan government and we are inviting the national transitional council to appoint a new diplomat to take over the embassy in london. >> britain has joined 29 other countries in recognizing the national transitional council. france did so at the start. germany, turkey, and
to the phone hacking scandal by closing down britain's best-selling sunday newspaper. but the investigation continues, with reports that a former editor and adviser to the british prime minister is to be arrested. dozens are killed in days of violent clashes between rival political groups in the pakistan city of karachi. and a final flight for the u.s. space shuttle atlantis. it prepares for its final journey to the stars. this is newsday. >> hello and welcome. it is the phone hacking scandal which has stunned britain. today came the biggest bombshell of all. britain's best-selling newspaper, "news of the world," is being shut down. the closure comes after a public outcry, but it has not lifted the spotlight from the murdoch empire, which controls 40% of circulation in the u.k. and has worldwide reach. >> rupert murdoch, 1969, shortly after he bought a newspaper that was to become his very profitable pride and joy. >> 4 give the individual by all means, but you cannot forget. >> 42 years later, he might well have made the same remarks about the news at the paper that became thoroughly rotte
this to american news -- newspapers. but in britain, he apologized to the british public for the hacking scandal. the real question is what will be amended in a select committee today on questions on whether or not there was a cover-up. this has shaken many of the foundations of the british political scale. >> four decades, -- for decades, rupert murdoch has towered over britain's. but what will remain of him? has this shifted the balance between politicians and media in britain? >> the relationship became too close. we all want the support of newspaper groups and broadcasting organizations. do we spend enough time asking questions how these organizations are regulated? there is a new chance to do that. that is what we are born to do today. >> a spotlight a listing on the relationship between the british and the media elite. politicians in the former leaders are distancing themselves from news corp.. >> the politicians are pleased about that. >> as the murdoch's in a prepared for the committee, some believe it is a moment for catharsis for politicians. will the day-to-day dealings with politicia
." >> this is bbc world news america. i m.j. and o'brien. britain recognizes the main opposition group as the governing authority, but will it break the stalemate? still on alert in norway, the suffering from last week's attacks continue to grip the country as the government promises an investigation. and counting down to the olympics, with just one year to go. london is busy getting ready. welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and also around the globe. after months of nato bombing and continuing combat on the ground, the international effort to remove moammar gaddafi from power got another boost today. britain declared but another governing authority and expel the remaining diplomats from london. this follows the move by the u.s. and paves the way to unfreezing millions in dollars. but will it make a difference on the ground? john simpson reports. >> 6:00 in the morning in the mountains. spies have warned of a buildup of pro gaddafi forces nearby, but these are not trained soldiers. they are just a bunch of volunteers. hours pass, and the gaddafi troops do not attack. the rebels w
had a good discussion today about how we can build on the agreement, and i said how britain will support this, investing in projects to build the key tray corridors and simplify and speed up border crossings. as the president has said, we also had important discussions on developments in the middle east, in north africa, and in zimbabwe. we share the same strategic vision. we believe people's legitimate aspirations for a job and a voice must be met with reform and openness, not with repression and violence. on libya, i thanked president zuma for south africa's support in securing united nations security resolution 1970 and 1973 and voice leadership in the african union on this vital issue. now, it is no secret that we have disagreed on some aspects of how to respond to violence in libya, but we are agreed on the immediate imperative that all sides must take every effort to avoid the loss of civilian life. we agree on the process needed that the only safe and peaceful solution lies through a political transition, led and owned by the libyan people and backed by the united nat
on the ground? we have this report. >> the government now is a significant boost for them. britain is following the u.s. and france in intensify the pressure on the libyan regime. >> we no longer recognize them as the representatives of the libyan government, and we are inviting the transitional council to appoint a new diplomatic convoy to take over the embassy in london. >> the libyan embassy in london is in nights bridge. the ambassador here was expelled in may. now, they have three days to leave. the other diplomats must go, as well. and they must deal with the frozen assets, now controlled by opponents of the regime. this is an important symbolic moment, especially for the small group of rebel supporters, who come here but to replace the flag of the gaddafi regime with their alone. the question is, what difference will it make on the ground? joining the demonstrators today, a former financial adviser at the embassy. >> this is very positive. it is a psychological boost, and the council will be able to use those funds to help the libyan people, and hopefully, this is just the beginning. >>
culture in britain. there is no evidence the "new york post" published stories similar to those published in "news of the world" or "the sun." it does at the least raise questions about the journalism here. >> in other news, security forces in syria have shot at least 20 protesters across the country. throughout the day, thousands of people staged some of the biggest protests so far against the rule of president asisad. roughly 1400 civilians have died since the uprising began in march. in egypt, thousands rallied in the two largest cities. five months after president mubarak was removed from power, they are becoming impatient with the interim military rulers. they are demanding that police officers accused of killing protesters during the uprising be put on trial. in libya, the fighting continues. the main opposition group was given a diplomatic boost today. the united states and other nations have recognized it as the governing authority in the country. the announcement came from istanbul where secretary of state hillary clinton is meeting with other members of the group. for more on th
authorities. britain announces its next epps to push the gaddafi regime out. >> we are inviting the national transitional council to appoint a new libyan envoy in london. >> welcome to gmt. i am naga munchetty. intelligence chief says the man behind friday's attacks acted completely on his own. >> one year until the opening ceremony of the london 2012 olympic games, i am live at the aquatic center. speaking to athletes about their expectations ahead of the tournament. >> hello. it is midday in london, 7:00 a.m. in washington, and the foreign office has just unveiled the latest deaths in the campaign to push the libyan leader, -- the latest steps in the campaign to push the libyan leader, muammar gaddafi, out of power. we'll get reaction from tripoli in a moment. first, here is the announcement made by the british foreign secretary. >> we informed him that he and other regime diplomats from the gaddafi regime must now leave the united kingdom. we no longer recognize them as the representatives of the libyan government and we are inviting the national transitional council to appoint a new envo
and forth between britain and japan, but the case appeared to go nowhere. searching for the prime suspect and eventually getting to see him in the dark. bill hawker wanted the courts to give his daughter's killer the heaviest punishment possible. theoretically, that could be the death penalty, though prosecutors have called for life in jail instead. their daughter's killer has also written a book in which he details the crime and has promised the proceeds to lindsay's family. her parents have said they won't touch the money and want nothing from him. >> a new study suggests that taller people are at greater risk of developing a range of cancers. the research in the lancet found that, in women, the likelihood rose by 16% for every four-inch increase in height. they said taller men were also at increased risk. our health correspondent, james hughes, has the details. >> we're all at risk of developing cancer, and rising rates mean four in 10 of us will get the disease at some point in our lives. but it now seems taller people are the most vulnerable. ed study looks at cancer risks over a sin
an appeal at against extradition from britain to sweden. he is accused of sexual offenses. his lawyers told the high court in london that the description of the charges were misleading and unfair. he denies any wrongdoing. still to come on the program, more on the u.k. phone-hacking scandal, what it means for media relationships around the world. >> breyer earth elements are crucial, but to controls the lion's share of production? police and guatemalans have arrested two men in the collection of argentine singer. he was one of the most respected folk singers. his car was ambushed. >> he gave voice to millions of the disenfranchised latin america is back on home soil. after his violent killing in guatemala city last week, the argentine folk singer was returned or he will be mourned the most. they also have questions about how a musician once named the u.n. peace envoy could have been brutally murdered. >> we know there is an investigation about the person who drove the car. if anything more further from the ideals of time, it will be violence or anything related to the drug cartels. >> the a
not have any words. she is sad. >> what they want is for colonel gaddafi to stand trial. this week, britain shifted its position. they said that colonel gaddafi must leave power, he could stay on in the country if that is what the people want. look at what happened here. look at the scale of destruction. hundreds of people died in the battle for misrata and they cannot forget or forgive. what they want is justice. however much britain frowns on america on a quick settlement, it is difficult to imagine a solution that is acceptable for the government in tripoli and the people of misrata. the city is still under attack. a petrol depot struck by rockets this week, this is hardly conducive for peace talks. the truth is that misrata remains on a war footing, hundreds of its men are dug-in, stretching for miles along the latest from lines. they are a little bit more organized, better equipped, even if they cannot always see who they are firing at. they plan to go all the way to tripoli. progress has been slower than britain and the west hoped-for. the fighting, not talking, that is the concentrat
, damaged by a phone hacking scandal, "news of the world," closes as of britain's best-selling newspaper after a run of over 100 years. >> certain individuals did not live up to the standards and qualities of journalism that we believe in. >> medical breakthroughs, for the first time scientists have been able to make an organ at of synthetic materials. will we have -- the end of an era is here for the space program. will mother nature cooperate? >> welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and around the globe. it is the scandal which has stunned britain and today came the biggest bombshell of all. "news of the world," has been shut down. this has been in print since the 1800's. this comes after a public outcry. news corp. controls 40% of newspaper distribution in the u.k. and has a worldwide reach. >> this has been the famous newspaper in britain but the "news of the world," is being shut because it became famous for all the wrong reasons. this afternoon, the chairmen of news international announced that this sunday's edition will be the last and all revenues will go to good causes. it i
, news international closes britain's best-selling paper after a run of 168 years. >> clearly, practices of certain individuals did not live up to the standards and quality of journalism that we believe in and that i believe in. >> medical breakthroughs. for the first time, scientists have been able to make an organ out of synthetic materials. and will we have lived off? the end of an era is almost here for the -- lift off? the end of an era is almost here for the space program, but it all depends on mother nature. welcome to our viewers on pbs in america and around the globe. is the hacking scandal which has stunned britain, and it today came the biggest bombshell of all. britain's best-selling newspaper, the news of the world, has been shut down. it has been in print since the 1800's. the closure comes after a public outcry, but it has not lifted the spotlight from the murdoch empire which controls 40% of newspaper circulation in the u.k. and has worldwide reach. >> rupert murdoch, 1969, shortly after he bought a newspaper, "the news of the world," that was to become his very profitabl
, "bbc world news." >> they are all agreed. britain's political party's united against news corporation as the hacking fallout grows, and could there be an american investigation. an american politician wants to know about the hacking scandal, if it's extended to 9/11 victims. >> and pro vin shall brother escapes from an explosion on his way to a funeral. >> and coming up on the program, plenty more dead fish in the sea. what europe is doing about its wasteful side to have fishing industry. and the latest winner of the euro lottery. how would you spend it? >> hello, the combined political weight of all three main hearts in britain will come down on the media organization news corporation today. a parliamentary debate rupert murdoch's takeover bid will be asked to be dismissed. it's due to unacceptable practices to gain information for stories including phone hacking. >> united against rupert murdoch. the conservatives and demonstrates have made a highly unusual decision to support this calling on him to withdraw his bid. >> it's in the public interest that rupert murdoch sees there's co
applications for similar cases against the dutch state. >> for years, the news of the world, britain's top selling sunday tabloid and part of rupert murdoch of global media empire at news corp. has been dogged by claims of phone hacking. now the story has taken another twist. today, prime minister, david cameron, spoke of his shock over allegations that a mobile phone belonging to a young british girl murdered nine years ago was hacked into by a private detective working for the newspaper. >> for months, this scandal has been growing and growing as more and more celebrities and politicians aren't formed their phones had been hacked. but now, and much more serious allegation has shocked the country. a 13-year-old went missing in 2002. her body was found six months later. the latest claim is that the news of the world packed into her phone while she was missing and some messages may have been deleted in the process. david cameron, who is on a trip to afghanistan, made his feelings clear. >> if they are true, this is a truly dreadful act and a truly dreadful situation. what i read in the pape
, "bbc world news." >> britain's new phone headache hacking news spreads. it prompts a rare debate in british parliament. >> and concerns portugal may need another bailout after its debt rating is reduced to junk status. >> and will it beya has produced a western arc to protect the city of misratah. welcome to "bbc world news." i'm david eades. also coming up, the news of family in. how could this latest tragedy have been prevented? >> and the focus of the berlin fashion week. >> the phone hacking scandal right at the heart of the media group news international continues to deepen as the british parliament prepares to hold an emergency debate on the issue. police now told the relatives some of the victims of the 1995 bombing that some of the victims' cell phones may have been hacked by the news of the world. >> tomorrow is the sixth anniversary of the london bombing. today some of the enter reaved are enduring fresh anguish, what is described as details discovered as part of the latest investigation into phone hacking. >> these parents lost their son david in the bombing. he is not
and raises more and more difficult questions for the police in britain. because originally the police said they looked into the allegations and said it was just a few isolated incidents and that there wasn't any need to investigate further and that now poses the question that either there was some kind of coverup at scotland yard or they just didn't think those allegations were serious enough to warrant investigation. and as we've now seen such as the phone a murdered school girl having had her phone hacked, this has really blown up. >> it's difficult for police, but how difficult is it now for politicians like the prime minister? >> it is difficult. all recent prime ministers have tried to keep on the right side of rupert merdock and news international, because they own about 40% of the british media. so they are very powerful. but many say that now has to change and there was a sense that proops for too long there had been too much deference for titles like news of the world and david cameron is vulnerable on this, because he has links to two former editors from news of the world. one w
no evidence of that in norway or in britain. >> but for now, the focus in norway is on the dead and those missing. the police will release more names as the terrible process of identifying all have been lost goes on. james robbins, bbc news, oslo. >> and as norway continues to mourn, the country's justice minister has praised the security services for their response to friday's attack, but four days on, there are questions about whether the police were quick enough to get to the rampage. local residents were the first to organize the rescue. gavin hewitt has been talking to some of those involved. >> across from the island, where so many died, there are still people waiting, with young people still missing. what is emerging here is the story of those rescued and questions about the police response. the heart of this rescue is a camp site. the two launched their boat to help people swimming from the island, where a man dressed as a policeman was hunting their friends down. >> the first thing was, they do not trust us. "i cannot trust you." we have to make some comfort to them to say, "yes,
against the dutch state. >> for years, the news of the world, britain's top selling sunday tabloid and part of rupert murdoch of global media empire at news corp. has been dogged by claims of phone hacking. now the story has taken another twist. today, prime minister, david cameron, spoke of his shock over allegations that a mobile phone belonging to a young british girl murdered nine years ago was hacked into by a private detective working for the newspaper. >> for months, this scandal has been growing and growing as more and more celebrities and politicians aren't formed their phones had been hacked. but now, and much more serious allegation has shocked the country. a 13-year-old went missing in 2002. her body was found six months later. the latest claim is that the news of the world packed into her phone while she was missing and some messages may have been deleted in the process. david cameron, who is on a trip to afghanistan, made his feelings clear. >> if they are true, this is a truly dreadful act and a truly dreadful situation. what i read in the papers is quite, quite shoc
in britain, news corp. has made big business mistakes in america. it owns dow jones -- it bought at dow jones in 2007 and two years later it was worth $2.8 billion, less than their purchase price. myspace was bought for $580 million in 2005, sold for $35 million this year. but one of their largest shareholder still has huge confidence in the company. >> you have seen a business that has evolved, moving from newspapers and to other media, and moving more fee- based business model as opposed to advertising based. i think there is an awful lot of good steps that have been made, and i am very impressed overall with the company's success. >> rupert murdoch is back in america, more comfortable perhaps in a country where big investors still back him as the chief executive. >> here is a man, even though he is 80 years old, warren buffett is 80 years old and he is doing well, sumner redstone, and these are men with long track records of great success. to not want some of that wisdom in there, i think, would be a mistake. as will rogers said, good judgment comes from experience, and a lot of that comes
about that. >> any other information on what his relationship with britain is? >> i do not know. it is too early in the case. i do not alloknow. >> is it true he went to liberia? can you confirm that? >> i do not know. >> how about the ways he communicated with the cells. >> i cannot comment because i don't know. it is difficult for me to answer. >> there was a fear he might send signals to those cells. that was a fear. >> did he want to read the manifesto at the initial hearing? >> yes, he wanted to read it and he read some of it for the judge. >> how much? >> maybe five minutes or something like that. >> [inaudible] at what point exactly? >> after the bombing, after the action in the island, and he also thought he would be killed at the trial. he believes someone would kill him. >> the other cells [inaudible] >> that is correct. >> [inaudible] has he said anything about that? >> he knows he is not permitted to say anything. >> [inaudible] >> it is complicated for me to answer. >> he actually surrendered to police -- can you explain why he did that? >> he was surrounded by the
, "bbc world news." >> the security transition in afghanistan -- after america, britain confirmed plans to step back from combat duties. visiting afghanistan, of princeton -- british prime minister cameron says he was confident the country will be able to look after its own security by 2014. >> as we see a stronger and more confident afghan national army, stronger police -- many of whom we trained ourselves -- and also local police, i do think it is right to start planning the withdrawal of some of our troops. welcome to "gmt." also on this program -- newspaper executives are expected to meet british police today over allocation the phones of a murdered teenage girl was attacked -- allegations. back and in fighting spirit. the venezuelan president makes a surprise return from cuba following treatment for cancer. it is midday here in london, 7:00 a.m. in washington, d.c., and mid afternoon in afghanistan where nato has confirmed the death of another four of its soldiers. they were killed in the east of the country where foreign troops, mostly american, are battling a fierce taliban insur
for joining us. now to the hacking scandal which continues in britain. but those even further. after gordon brown claimed in an interview that the "sunday times" also part of the murdoch empire hire criminals to obtain the information. there is some flash photography. >> here is gordon that downing street with rupert's starter next to him and the top editor on the right. for years, team brown stayed close to t murdoch. no more. peace miles fell away. gordon brown accused them and their newspaper of using criminals to investigate his private life. >> some were getting information from my lawyers. like a tax attorney said that medical records have been broken into. i do not tell how all of this happened. in two instances, there is absolute proof that news international, was involved in hiring people to get this information. ith people that the work wa our criminals. >> this is the editor of "the sunday times." in a statement tonight, they believe ethanol law was broken, no criminal was used edie story was published giving both sides of the hearing. he attacked the way it reported that his you
? >> and now, "bbc world news." >> base scandal claims its latest. -- the scandal claims its latest in britain. who will be next as more come under scrutiny? >> welcome to "gmt." the united states top commander in afghanistan hands over control and is now going to be in charge of the cia. germany wins the women's world cup. it is 7:00 a.m. in washington. midday here in london. this is where the scandal surrounding the news of the world continues. the british prime minister insists that his decision to hire a former executive from the newspaper is quite different. citizens step down after being criticized for employing the newspaper's former deputy editor. richard has the latest developments. >> the country's most senior police officer is the latest and most high-profile casualty of the scandal. he became personally involved after this man was arrested a few days ago. a former editor @ "the news of the world close " -- news of the world close " who went on to work for the police. >> i played no role in the management of that contract. we must have suspected the alleged involvement and let me sa
of great britain on his arm, and then the ambassador would come with the president's hostess on his arm, a wife if there was a wife. jefferson had the rule: he who is next to the door goes in first. this created a diplomatic flap because the ambassador of great britain was just outraged at this. c-span: again, you--you're writing about people who were born between 1776 and 1800. >> guest: yes. c-span: so the focus--the years that you're really focused of them being old enough to be involved, would be what? >> guest: well, i would say really the first three decades of the 19th century. c-span: 1800 to 1830? >> guest: mm-hmm. mm-hmm. i have material on the 1790s because it's a very tumultuous decade and it's important, and there are some of them who, by that time, are in their 20s. but, yes, most of the action. c-span: give us a profile on what the united states looked like in those 30 years: people, where they had come from, what their religion was. >> guest: well, to give a profile of a country that was as rambunctious as american society in those decades is going to be very hard. i can
a damning report from the way britain's biggest police force has dealt with the phone hacking scandal. they are accused of a catalog of failures and a scathing report of some senior offers. >> i can't say more than that. >> that's john yates describing his choice not to reopen the inquiry when he gave evidence to m.p.'s last week. in the report, they agree with him. >> i'm not letting you get away with that. absolutely not. >> and even more critical. his conduct is described as unprofessional and inappropriate. but the report also criticizes news international. accusing the company of deliberately thwarting the various investigations. yesterday rupert murdoch denied he was responsible. >> no. >> you're not responsible? >> [inaudible] >> the moment when a member of the public threw a fope pie at him has generated many of the headlines. it was scrutinized on both sides of the atlantic. >> but now at least u.s. investors appear to have been reassured. and the share price rallied rising by more than 5%. but the threat of a criminal investigation still hangs over the company. today's home
economy is stable at this time because the government has taken difficult decisions to get to britain's defeat. to -- to britain's debt. and they announced they have no plans to abandoned that plan. >> to norway, and the justice minister praising the fantastic work done by police after the bombing and shooting on utoeya island. but there has been criticism to have time it took police to get to the island. it's emerged that police also overestimated the number of people who died on the island and revised the death toll from 86 to 68. eight people were also killed in the bomb attack and a number of people are still missing from the island. >> the most important thing is we are completely focused on supporting the families of those and all those affected. we have things in mace all over the country and have people in our government affected. we have missing people at utoeya. and we have many people deeply affected. we have to look after them. i'm completely open to discuss how the response to these attacks have been handled. but i would like to emphasize that the police have done a magni
of the world," britain's top-selling sunday tabloid and part of rupert murdoch's global media empire, has been afflicted by claims of phone hacking. david cameron expressed his shock that the phone of a girl who was murdered years ago was hacked into by a "news of the world" correspondent. >> the scandal has been growing and growing as more and more people learned that their phones had been hacked. now, a much more serious allegation has shocked the country. 13-year-old 2 went missing -- 13-year-old milly dowler went missing. there were allegations that "news of the world" packed into her phone and that some messages might have been deleted in that act. >> if these allegations are true, this is a dreadful act, a dreadful situation. what i have read in the papers is quite shocking -- that someone could do this -- while knowing that the police were trying to find this person and find out what had happened. >> there is more pressure on the prime minister's friend, rebekah brooks, chief executive of news international in the u.k., editor at "news of the world" when milly dowler went missing. she h
industry. bbc news. >> while the pressure continues to build in britain, as you have seen here in the united states, there are growing calls for investigations into the activities of news corporation. joining me is our washington correspondent. thank you for coming in. who is calling for this investigation, and what would be the focus? >> their two separate areas. it comes from congress, where interest has picked up suddenly. the first and most sensitive area is on the issue of whether or not there was an attempt by a news of the world reporter to hack into or obtain the information that might lead to the ability to hack into the voice mails of 9/11 victims. and various senators and one member of the house, who runs the moment security committee, have called for investigations. he has written to the fbi, calling for an investigation. the second issue which is separate is whether or not the payments through allegedly made in britain by members of the "news of the world," employees of new corp., whether those payments actually breach the foreign corrupt practices act. america tak
the murdoch news empire is very powerful as well and back there and britain, politicians are simply too scared to confront the murdoch empire? >> a british company could not go and buy anything more than 20%, he has 30% of british sky. it is been argued that he has far too much power and they assume that his papers decide whether they will become the prime minister or the next government. that is totally unacceptable. >> it was your former boss who was one of the first to cozy up to rupert murdoch. >> if you ask him, and you can ask gordon brown. they used to be played up funny enough by rebecca brooks. they have far too much influence and they have produced this kind of scandal and it must top. >> are you confident that this will stop now that the public is so outraged by who else has been hacked? >> the public is rightfully outraged by this. there is a failure by the commission. the police have been cozying up. you can be assured that parliament would like a piece of this and across the party lines. we have to do something about the media moguls like mr. murdoch who are saying that everythin
to understand that many of the tabloid practices seen in britain in the print press have begun to appear in the united states in our broadcast and cable media. we are hardly perfect on this side of the pond. >> what do you think is drawing that? also the 24/7 news cycle, the desire to have something new and something more. that pushes a lot of journalism outlets into minutia. they go after more detail and more information. you saw that in the united states in the case of a congressman anthony wiener. once that got going, there was such a drive to get every single photo, every single phone message possible. i think you see that in general. once media outlets have access to the most private information, they often keep looking for something more to put up on the screen. in britain, perhaps, in print. >> good to have your insight into the media industry. thank you for joining me from wisconsin. let's look at some of the other stories making headlines. a collision between a train and a bus in northern india has killed at least 38 people near the town of patiyali. the bus was carrying about 7
in britain. >> fox is a very conservative media outlet, it takes a conservative bent and sides with republicans routinely, against the democrats. i think there has been a lot of liberal anger at mr. murdoch over the years. i also think there have been liberal politicians, democrats, who have been more loath to criticize mr. murdoch in the past, or fox, for fear of having some of the kind of repercussions that british politicians were also afraid of. they do not become targets of fox news. >> in congress, concerns are growing, especially after the suggestion, still unsubstantiated, that news of the world journalists may have been hacking the phones of 9/11 victims. calls have been made to the department of justice and the securities and exchange commission to investigate the allegations. u.s. companies are banned from paying bribes to foreign officials. >> last week when the story broke, this became an interesting story to americans. we found it titillating, fascinating, but it was not necessarily penetrating the consciousness of the greater american public. this week, on the ot
is very powerful as well and back there and britain, politicians are simply too scared to confront the murdoch empire? >> a british company could not go and buy anything more than 20%, he has 30% of british sky. it is been argued that he has far too much power and they assume that his papers decide whether they will become the prime minister or the next government. that is totally unacceptable. >> it was your former boss who was one of the first to cozy up to rupert murdoch. >> if you ask him, and you can ask gordon brown. they used to be played up funny enough by rebecca brooks. they have far too much influence and they have produced this kind of scandal and it must top. >> are you confident that this will stop now that the public is so outraged by who else has been hacked? >> the public is rightfully outraged by this. there is a failure by the commission. the police have been cozying up. you can be assured that parliament would like a piece of this and across the party lines. we have to do something about the media moguls like mr. murdoch who are saying that everything will be ad
. is this a watershed moment for britain's political culture? >> you can downplay it and denied that the problem is a deep, or accept the seriousness of the situation and deal with it. i want to deal with it. these inquiries, i believe, give chance for a fresh start and i want to take it. >> welcome to gmt. so in the program -- south sudan on the brink of nationhood. good will, but will it last? an appeal for emergency funds for the horn of africa. hundreds of thousands abandon their homes. it is midday in london, 7:00 a.m. in washington, and 9:00 p.m. in sydney. prime minister david cameron has announced two investigations into what he calls the disgusting phone hacking scandal, which has sent shockwaves through the country's political culture. pledged to get to the truth of what happened to, but also to clean up the culture. within minutes, police confirmed the rest of the former editor of the "news of the world" who was hired by mr. cameron to be his communications chief. >> one former "news of the world" employee and calls for her resignation. today, it's another. he went on to be director o
that the telephone of a murder teenage girl was hacked. britain has confirmed that it will withdraw more troops from afghanistan next year. the british prime minister david cameron defended the decision that troops will no longer be involved in a combat role by 2014. his country is committed to a longstanding relationship with afghanistan. >> we will withdraw troops this year and next year. we will be sending combat operations by the end of 2014. we will not have troops in the numbers that we have now. but we will have a long-term relationship. we will have a relationship that will consist of a very large a program as we help you to build the future. a relationship based on trade and diplomacy and military training. the president and i did they have discussed our plan to build a model academy for training. the afghan army officers of the future that will form the backbone of your already successful army. that would involve 100 british troops and funding from other nations. $38 million from the americans will go into the initiative. our relationship will involve close and frank political contact betw
robinson reports. >> end to britain's most powerful, most feared media going you will. the policemen are there to protect rupert and james murdoch, not take that -- them into questioning. that fell into a crew of m.p.'s. his wife was behind him. offering physical and emotional support. his son and once heir apparent sat anxiously at his side throughout. >> i would like to say how sorry i am and how sorry we are. >> rupert murdoch was determined to deliver one key line. >> i would just like to say one sentence -- this is the most humbling day of my life. thank you. >> they were sorry, they were humble but whose fault was the criminality in their company? >> do you accept that ultimately you are responsible for this whole fiasco? >> no. >> who is responsible? >> the people they trusted to run it and then maybe the people they trusted. >> who that was he wasn't say. >> this is not an excuse. maybe it's an explanation. news world is less than 1 -- news corp is less than 1% of our company. i employ 53,000 people around the world. >> at this point his wife patrolleded him to stop banging t
of them including france and britain, do have sympathy for the palestinian position. however, they do not want an american veto. they are afraid it could become violent in the occupied territories and that could, perhaps, get entangled in the protest of the wider arab world. that has not happened yet. so far, the air of spring has been very focused on internal issues. -- the era of the spring has been very focused on internal issues. america's standing in the region could take a hard hit, and the western states, too. the europeans are looking for a compromise, trying to convince the destiny is to drop their bid for membership, but to give them enough to get back to the peace process. whether or not they succeed, there is a sense that the arab- israeli conflict is becoming a major issue at the u.n. again and it will dominate in the coming months. >> britain has joined france in suggesting colonel gadhafi could remain in libya so long as he steps down from power. the british foreign secretary has been holding talks with his french counterpart. he said it was up to the libya -- libyan pe
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